NEWS | March 19, 2021

502nd SFG civilian receives visionary leadership award

By Airman 1st Class Tyler McQuiston 502nd Air Base Wing Public Affairs

Jenny Ng-Del Campo, a 502nd Security Forces Group standardization evaluation assessor, was recognized as Air Education and Training Command’s Brig. Gen. Wilma Vaught Visionary Leadership Award recipient Feb. 1. She was presented a coin by her leadership Feb. 11 during a wing staff meeting at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph. 

Ng-Del Campo received the award after exhibiting similar qualities to those retired Brig. Gen. Wilma Vaught is known for. 

“I was very humbled and honored; truthfully, because I don’t see what I do as award-winning,” Ng-Del Campo said. “I do what I do to make the security forces members better at JBSA.” 

The award was created and named in honor of Vaught’s outstanding service and dedication to the Air Force and nation, both during her career and after her retirement. It is presented to officers O-6 and below, enlisted Airmen E-9 and below, and civilians GS-15 and below, from any career field or occupation. Individuals must exhibit innovation, commitment, a selfless spirit of service for others and personal efforts to improve the integration and opportunities for women in the Air Force. 

Ng-Del Campo was nominated by her supervisor Master Sgt. Melissa Jackson, a 502nd SFG standardization evaluation superintendent.  

“Ng-Del Campo is a remarkable female civilian who has dedicated over 20 years of outstanding service, thus far, to the Air Force, and continually strives to significantly improve the integration and opportunities for women while inspiring others,” Jackson said. 

The nomination for the award included an endorsement memorandum listing Ng-Del Campo’s accomplishments, an Air Force Form 1206 describing Ng-Del Campo’s innovation, commitment, and selfless spirit of service, a signed public release statement and an official photograph. 

Ng-Del Campo said much of her passion comes from the female influences she grew up having in her life. Her mother worked unconventional jobs and taught her that gender inequality social norms involving job opportunities were something she did not have to adhere to. 

“My mother worked as a lineman for our local power company in Vermont during the 80s and early 90s and she was the only female,” Ng-Del Campo said. “After I got married, I was further exposed to an amazing woman when I learned that my mother-in-law, Marcella, was the first African-American woman pilot in the armed forces.” 

In November 1979, then-2nd Lt. Marcella A. Hayes became the first African American woman in the U.S. military to earn her aviator wings when she completed helicopter flight training at the U.S. Army Aviation Center, Fort Rucker, Alabama, according to the Army Women’s Foundation. She was just 23 years old.  

“To the world, these two women were breaking barriers and carving out a path for women, but to me they were mom,” said Ng-Del Campo, who does her job with passion and heart, and feels that if she can do it, anyone can. 

Jackson said Ng-Del Campo’s personal and innovative efforts have inspired positive changes that significantly improved women's inclusion in the Air Force.  

“Her impact and benefit of visionary leadership for women's issues in the Air Force were, and will continue to be, instrumental in furthering the role of women,” she said.