Home : News : News
JBSA News

U.S. Army North preps for Army Combat Fitness Test

By Sgt. Andrew Valles | U.S. Army North Public Affairs | Feb. 11, 2019

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas —

U.S. Army North Soldiers at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston participated in training for the Army Combat Fitness Test, learning techniques to better prepare for the new test Jan. 28.

“We conducted the ACFT train up, showing proper technique for the Three Rep Max Deadlift and the Hand-Release Pushup,” said Sgt. 1st Class Towaski Christion, U.S. Army North Master Fitness Trainer. “We are going to train every third Monday of the month showing Soldiers proper techniques for all events.”

The ACFT is a six-event test that is age- and gender-neutral. The ACFT is designed to provide Soldiers with a modern assessment of their physical fitness and help them maintain a high level of fitness, while ensuring they are capable of handling physically demanding combat situations.

“The ACFT is a more combat-focused PT test, whereas the Army Physical Fitness Test was a test of physical ability on three events. The ACFT is a six exercise event that will test the full body capabilities of a Soldier,” Christion said.

The new test was created to better prepare Soldiers for combat-related tasks and will replace the current Army Physical Fitness Test beginning October 2020.

“It’s about change and putting more into just doing the three events that we do for the APFT,” said 1st Sgt. Johnna M. Covington, Headquarters Support Company first sergeant. “This will show the overall physical readiness of all our Soldiers, a total body workout opposed to just the three events.”

The events each Soldier must complete are three repetition maximum deadlift, standing power throw, hand-release push-up, sprint-drag-carry, leg tuck, and a two-mile run.

The Army has published the ACFT Training Guide with exercises, drills and training aids to help develop strength, endurance and mobility using common strength training methods. Additionally, the Center for Army Lessons Learned published an AFCT handbook discussing the six events, testing procedures, with a training guide.

“Don’t be afraid to ask for help,” Christion said. “There are a lot of people that are trained up on the ACFT and they are ready and willing to share the knowledge.”

For more information about the ACFT, visit the Army’s microsite at http://www.army.mil/acft.